All-girls robotics team

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No, they’re not characters in a new animated TV series. They’re an all-girls high school robotics team that made waves at the National Robotics League grand championship last weekend.

No, they’re not characters in a new animated TV series. They’re an all-girls high school robotics team that made waves at the National Robotics League grand championship last weekend.

The four-person team didn’t take the top prize with their combat robot (they came in fourth), but the girls said that’s not what it was about.

“I have learned that success is not necessarily measured by whether you win or lose, but more importantly by whether or not you have gained knowledge,” said Julie Schiffer.

This knowledge is increasingly important to an industry that’s aging and male-dominated.

“The idea is to expose students to the real-life manufacturing processes,” said Bill Padnos, director of youth engagement with the National Tooling and Machining Association, which organizes the annual contest. “This is a group that could surface our future engineers, programmers, welders.”

There’s a desire to attract more young people to skilled manufacturing jobs.

“The industry wants to break the gender stereotype too,” Padnos said. “It’s important when we have an aging U.S. workforce coupled with a shortage of 2 million manufacturing workers over the next 10 years.”

The four-person team didn’t take the top prize with their combat robot (they came in fourth), but the girls said that’s not what it was about.

“I have learned that success is not necessarily measured by whether you win or lose, but more importantly by whether or not you have gained knowledge,” said Julie Schiffer.

This knowledge is increasingly important to an industry that’s aging and male-dominated.

“The idea is to expose students to the real-life manufacturing processes,” said Bill Padnos, director of youth engagement with the National Tooling and Machining Association, which organizes the annual contest. “This is a group that could surface our future engineers, programmers, welders.”

There’s a desire to attract more young people to skilled manufacturing jobs.

“The industry wants to break the gender stereotype too,” Padnos said. “It’s important when we have an aging U.S. workforce coupled with a shortage of 2 million manufacturing workers over the next 10 years.”

 

Full article: http://money.cnn.com/2015/05/20/technology/robotics-team-high-school-girls/?iid=EL

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